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neil/lehrer productions >> ifill: supreme court justices weighed a challenge to an arizona law requiring proof of citizenship for voter registration. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we talk to marcia coyle about today's court arguments, and ask about the broader implications for other immigration laws. >> ifill: then we turn to the banking crisis in cyprus, as european union leaders called for a tax on savings accounts, prompting a drop in global stocks. >. it's outright theft. >> woodruff: jeffrey brown kicks off a week of stories about the middle east, starting with israel's new governing coalition sworn into office today. >> ifill: paul solman reports on older workers in academic institutions, professors in the classroom long past age 65. >> am i keeping track of jobs? yes. that's okay. as long as i'm a good teacher, that's what's important. >> woodruff: and we examine the republican national committee's call for a new direction for the g.o.p., a road map hoping for a rebound in 2016 and beyond. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight
pitted a national law against a 2004 arizona voter registration bill. the case explores the extent of state powers against the controversial backdrop of voting restrictions. arizona's proposition 200 requires state residents to provide either a driver's license, passport, birth certificate or physical proof of citizenship before they can vote. but an existing federal law requires only a sworn statement of citizenship on a voter registration form. supporters say the arizona measure cuts down on voter fraud by keeping noncitizens from voting. but opponents argue the law unfairly tarring hes minorities, immigrants, and the elderly. the case is only the most recent dispute between arizona and the federal government related to immigration issues. over the summer, the supreme court upheld part of a top state law that allowed police to check for immigration papers. other states, including alabama, georgia, kansas and tennessee, have similar laws on the books and a number of other states are also considering comparable measures. the obama administration supports the challenge to the arizon
a's law. >> bill: colorado speaker of the house openly gay politician. "the denver post" called me a homophobe bigot. the man who wrote that will be here tonight. >> you are lucky o'reilly wasn't here today, sir. >> bill: also tonight, dennis miller on government waste and that could be brutal. caution, you are about to enter the no spin zone. the factor begins right now. >> bill: hi, i'm bill o'reilly. thanks for watching us tonight. new pope has been selected, so the talking points memo on how president obama is reacting to the budget chaos will be on our second segment tonight. but first the lead story. cardinal jorge bergoglio is the new pope. calling himself pope francis the 76-year-old is a jesuit who is an accomplished intellectual, a defender of the poor, and fairly conservative on social issues. pope francis is the 266th pope and is one of the oldest candidates in the conclave. joining us now from rome, fox news analyst father jonathan morris. so, let's take it step-by-step because people want to be introduced to the pope. i understand while cardinal in buenos aries, he di
-old law that makes it illegal for unmarried virginian couples to live together. >> jon: damn you, south. do not make me [bleep] on you. so you're saying virginia's not really for lovers? next you'll tell me michigan's not for bringing lemonade and condoms to someone who turns out to be nbc's... we'll apologize tomorrow. i guess we'll find out when virginia passed that law in tonight's episode of "19th century news." hello, everybody. my most he's teemed viewers, 'tis i your humble host. my guest tonight florence nightingale. she's written a new book on something called antiseptics and their role in fighting deadly infections on the irish. first the 1800s people. first, a brief word from our sponsor. when it's friday night and you don't have to be anywhere 'til tuesday. anyway, our top story tonight, virginia has banned living in sin. no longer shall unmarried men and women terrorize our good state with their privates behind closed doors relationship. in technology news there's a brand new labor saving device on the market called chinese people. chinese people because building a railroad
vote. supporters say law would keep illegal immigrants from casting ballots. the critics claim the real goal here is to keep minorities away from the polls. today the justices heard arguments from both sides. and the new york city mayor michael bloomberg is not backing down after the judge struck down his ban on large sugary sodas. in fact, the mayor has already outlawed smoking in bars and restaurants and now he he is going after tobacco again. how this time? you'll see for a while. my wife takes centrum silver. i've been on the fence about it. then i read an article about a study that looked at the long term health benefits of taking multivitamins. they used centrum silver for the study... so i guess my wife was right. [ male announcer ] centrum. always your most complete. i really like your new jetta! and you want to buy one like mine because it's so safe, right? yeah... yeah... i know what you've heard -- iihs top safety pick for $159 a month -- but, i wish it was more dangerous, like a monster truck or dune buggy! you can't have the same car as me! [ male announcer ] now everyone's
is a highly regarded securities lawyer, a professor at the university of san diego law school, and an expert on sarbanes-oxley. >> the idea was to have a criminal statute in place that would make ceos and cfos think twice, think three times, before they signed their names attesting to the accuracy of financial statements or the viability of internal controls. >> and this law has not been used at all in the financial crisis? >> it hasn't been used to go after wall street. it hasn't been used for these kinds of cases at all. >> why not? >> i don't know. i don't have a good answer to that question. i hope that it will be used. i think there clearly are instances where ceos and cfos signed financial statements that said there were adequate controls, and there weren't adequate controls. but i can't explain why it hasn't been used yet. >> we told partnoy about eileen foster's allegations of widespread mortgage fraud at countrywide and efforts to prevent the information from reaching her, the federal government, and the board of directors--in violation of the company's internal controls. i mean, th
, it was a law professor and a community organizer. and i think he was probably a liberal from the jump. and ted cruise comes out of a different political atmosphere. texas is very different from chicago he has the experience and the background of a guy who made it from scratch in the state of texas, which is -- you know low tax opportunity state. and you see the effect it's had on these two men, not that they wouldn't have those convictions anyway you can see it. >> bill: the nation is going to have to decide i think in the next four years what kind of country they want. because this is not going to be able to compromised. it's too big. brit hume, everybody, living large down there in miami. if you need any help, brit, call us tonight and we will help you out. directly ahead, a grizzly murder in colorado. will the woman beat the rap? there she is. big beef tonight. those reports after these messages. what's droid-smart ? with google now, it automatically knows when you need to leave for the airport, how much traffic there is, and can have your boarding pass ready. the droid razr maxx hd by moto
by the open records laws, and the sunshine laws and i think in san francisco we haven't talked to the city attorney about that or your counsel about that but the open records laws and sean -- sunshine laws protect them up to appointment so we're not in a situation where every transmission of information is available to the general public. if that is the case or that becomes the case then we change the strategy around a little bit so we can help to protect the identity of the candidates, not necessarily the backgrounds, but the identity of the candidates by still abiding by those laws. >>i think one of the strengths of your team is the tremendous community involvement and searches that you done. i find it interesting to the work you did in l.a. and many nonprofits. my hope is as our diverse communities expect topnotch transportation selection processes like this that we can involve them in as many of the aspects of the profile and the competencies that we can and i welcome a number of stakeholder groups and give you the recommendations as we sit down to one-on-one conversations. >> thank
to the classical and timeless ideas in our constitution. it's time for us to revive reagan's law for liberty to expand, government must shrink. we must have a message that is broad, our vision must be broad and that must be based on freedom. cenk: oh smaller government and freedom, i didn't see that coming. was there a single speech that did not mention ronald reagan? >> i would be hard-pressed to find one. that one reminded me of the old joe biden riff about giuliani where he said subject verb, 9/11, you're trying to build this event and the speech really as moving forward. their slogan had something about america's future, and you're doing nothing but hearkening back to the old idealogy of the conservative party and movement and talking about ronald reagan every other sentence. that's not very forward-looking. none of the speeches talked about the very real, pressing challenges we had medical reform with health care costs driving the economy into bad places and the fact that the voting public is going to look vastly different than the cpac attendees do. cenk: that's a great point. let's sh
fit, as it should be be managed, we don't have that flexibility because of the way the law is written. so there is talk providing that in military areas, but in areas like this it's hard to see unless there's a ground swell for a short-term solution to he restore the money. >> greta: and i thought the republicans offered the flexibility to the white house and white house declined it. >> they offered it on the defense side and it may happen. they said they want it as part of a broader package over the sequester, but we're getting to the point look, the sequester is the law, it's happened, the cuts are implemented. i think there's going to be more pressure to say, wait a second, back this up and find it in the civilian area and find something that shouldn't be cut and we cut it. >> greta: or find $137,000 whatever the number is, in waste in the department of education and they won't. thank you. >> thank you. >> greta: on capitol hill, a debate the homeland security department released 2000 illegal detainees, including felons. and taking on ice director john morton. >> it appears to me t
about what the second amendment is and what it is is not. so did ted cruz not go to law school? has he ever been to law school? >> i believe he went to harvard law school. do they teach law there? >> did they teach ted cruz to read what the supreme court said, especially in the landmark, the landmark decision regarding second amendment rights over 200 years was written in 2008. i'm just wondering why would he use his seat on the judiciary committee if he went to harvard to -- to -- to put forward a willfully ignorant statement about this bill violating the second amendment, because it does not. and ted cruz knows it does not. so who is he playing for? is he playing for -- for -- for people who can't read, for illiterates? i don't understand. you know, a lot of people out there that support ted cruz's position that will say, this is not a violation of the second amendment, however, i have real concerns because you take this first step, the next thing you know they are trying to overturn heller and try to get my shotguns and try to get my hundreding rifles. i don't mean to go on and on h
.s. senate. because, she explains, it is congress' job to pass laws and the supreme court can decide whether to throw them out or not. do you know what? that statement is exactly the problem. [applause] that statement is reminiscent of nancy pelosi when she was asked what is the constitutional basis of obamacare and her answer was, are you serious? there are a whole lot of politicians, democrats and republicans, in washington who have not looked at the constitution in a long, long time. let me answer speaker pelosi. yes, we are serious. [cheers and applause] the second amendment provides for the rights of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed. [cheers and applause] what part of shall not be infringed did they not understand? it does not just end with the second amendment. bigfirst amendment is a target in congress. set aside their love for regulating campaign speech because it seems every campaign elected official hates when the people dare criticize. tomorrow is st. patrick's day. my irish mother recently reminded me that it is more than a little ironic that the national p
plans to sign three new gun control laws tomorrow. here is a look at 13469 nsome o new legislation. keep in mind colorado home to two of the deadliest mass shootings in u.s. history. last year's aurora theater shooting and the massacre at columbine high school. >>> this is a crazy story. 13 pieces of art, $500 million, poof, gone in 81 seconds. you have these two men dressed as police, they target this boston museum here. get away with one of the biggest thefts in history. this is a crime that's gone unsolved 23 years. the fbi is revealing new information. we'll talk to the museum's security director next. >>> we're taking you back 23 years. yesterday one of the biggest art heights in american history this boston, 81 minutes, that's all it took, 13 masterpieces, stolen. take a listen. >> the thieves entered the first floor and went to the blue room and stole a monet painting. and then up to the second floor in the dutch room, they stole six paintings. some of them cut out of the frames. among them, three rembrandts, including the artist's only sea scape. >> yesterday the fbi tells us the
. there are letters monroe wrote to his daughters, to his two sons and laws, to his political advisers, that talk about family matters. he wrote letters home talking about meeting mrs. monroe, other women in washington recorded in their diaries. there is a fair amount about her. we do not have really anything from her point of view, which is merit -- very maddening. >> what we know from what we have about her relationship with her husband? >> they were devoted. they were apart for a couple of months here and there. throughout their 44-year marriage. usually, they were together. there is a wonderful letter. samuel from new york road his wife. he had been at a dinner at the white house when jefferson was president and it was right before monroe left to go to france to negotiate what became of the louisiana purchase. fineote, monroe has a feeling. he cannot stand to be from his wife, so he is taking her with him. that was pretty much their attitude. he was devoted to family, as well. that is really what they wanted to do. if they had their chores of how they would spend their time, it would be with
and as a matter of policy and law. >> reporter: it is a view that has evolved. here's her answer to a question from tim russer in 2004. >> i do not support gay marriage but i support civil unions. >> reporter: a stance she maintained during her 2008 presidential campaign. but while taking political stands on domestic issues, she made favorable attention from gay rights groups by expanding benefits for state workers working at the state department. and today asserted -- >> gay rights are human rights. a few years ago, bill and i celebrated as our own daughter married the love of her life, and i wish every parent that same joy. >> reporter: mrs. clinton's announcement comes a week before the supreme court is set to consider a challenge to the defense of marriage act, the federal law that defines marriage between a woman and a man. and it comes ten days after her husband urged the court to overturn the law, which he signed in 1996. the arc of mrs. clinton's changed opinion reflects a turnaround of public sentiment. in 2004, only 30% of americans supported same-sex marriage. by december of last ye
on friday, right. that wasn't's god's law. god's law is that we do penance but god's law isn't that-- so he could do that you mentioned another one, priestley celibacy. priestley celibacy is not a doctrine of the church, it's a discipline of the church. i do expect him to change it, no. could he change it, yes. possible, yes, probable, no. but there is that distinction. our nation of women, that's a doctrinal thing, that's to the discipline. >> rose: how do you respond to the fact that this really is the century of women, and this is a church that needs to have women as part of its -- >> sure, well i tell you this. when we walked into the sistine chapel, you all probably carried it live. we were saying the litany. saints. now the highest you can be called to in the catholic church is to be a saint. and of the saints that we prayed, more than half were women. so so the woman who is the greatest human being model, the person who is the greatest human being model for us happened to be a model. that's where the church is at her best. that's where -- that's where the church has always been known
it on the ballot and try to write into minnesota law, which ten years later, just about, we voted that down. i'm proud of that. minnesota citizens looked at that again this fall because legislatures did vote to put it on the ballot. it was wrong nine years ago and i think it was still wrong. voting in that circumstance, not just for me, but for our state, i'm hopeful now for our nation that people will recognize we shouldn't be discriminating and have laws on the book that discriminate against our friends, our neighbors and fellow citizens. >> what you did yesterday in minnesota is something i have never seen. it wasn't just a public apology, but you did it in the body you used to work. what was it like to go back in there in that role and tell them what you had to tell them? >> it was very freeing. the emotion came because it literally occurred to me as i sat down, this is a public apology. i was there to say trust me when i tell you that you can vote your conscience and your own compass and be okay. i should have done it. i regretted i didn't do it. it was -- it was very liberating quite hon
dream a reality. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. you'll have to pay five hundred bucks for your deductible. the truth? at allstate, you could pay zero. allstate gives you a hundred dollars off your deductible the day you sign up. then another hundred off every year you don't have an accident. let the good hands reward your safe driving with a deductible that goes away. ♪ deductible rewards. one more way you're in good hands with allstate. ♪ >>> well, the top of the show we asked you why are you awake? producer john tower, the answers please. >> we got erin g in tallahassee, florida. she says i just couldn't aaron seeing bill's beautiful face. don't think my husband. >> actually, erin your husband and i have been e-mailing behind your back. sorry to break this to you. a little tension this. i have my pope notes. white smoke. new pope. black smoke, no pope. didn't happen today. "morning joe" starts right now. . >>> you're looking at live pictures of the vatican where, this morning, smoke will pour from this chimney above the sistine chapel telling us whether or not a
deficient as a matter of law in giving his budget to congress. and congress acts from there. the president has to do three things. he has to tell the congress how much we are going to spend. how much revenue's coming in and what effect it will have to the deficit. but the president said deficits don't matter, budgets don't matter. what does matter? a household or a business can't run a household without a budget or a five-year plan -- at least. the charm offensive is nothing more than window dressing, trying to get the republicans to raise taxes without reining in spending and entitlements. >> jamie: but, david, the president has been clear that jobs air priority, and with all the back and forth with the spending and the cuts and the budget to come -- whatever it is -- how do you see him fulfilling the other promises that he had on the campaign trail on the other issues? can we get past this? >> i think we can get past this. and the reason why is because all the issues you just mentioned, jamie, are issues that the american people see, the american president obama as being in touch with th
sweat. introducing new secret clinical strength stress response scent. >>> those voter i.d. laws are keeping likely democrats from casting ballots. that's the conclusion of a new study that finds that voter id laws disproportionately hurt younger, minority voters. the study found two-thirds of young african-american voters, were asked to show i.d. before voting compared to 40% of young white voters. compared with their white counterparts, significantly more of those african-americans and latinos said their lack of an i.d. kept them from trying to vote in the first place. the study was conducted by researches for the university of chicago and washington u. out in st. louis. a talking train. this ge locomotive can tell you exactly where it is, what it's carrying, while using less fuel. delivering whatever the world needs, when it needs it. ♪ after all, what's the point of talking if you don't have something important to say? ♪ >>> welcome back to hardball. the differences between president obama and republicans shows no sign of snare rowing. zero republicans voted to advance th
the residence from the family member. >> shepard: this t. comes as the governor signs tough new gun control laws. tonight, a killing and a controversy. >> shepard: but first from fox this wednesday night, the president comes during tense times in a region that offensive dances on the brink of war. and it comes as iran works towards a nuclear weapon. and as we try to determine whether the government of syria has already deployed chemical weapons against its own people. because, in the words of our president, that would be a game changer. >> we have to make sure that we know exactly what happened, what was the nature of the incident, that what can we document? what can we prove. i have instructed my teams to work closely with all of the countries in the region and international organizations and institutions. to find out precisely whether or not this red line was crossed. >> shepard: talk of syria dominated much of the president's news conference in jerusalem this afternoon. he spoke alongside benjamin netanyahu. just a day after both the syrian regime and the syrian rebels accused each other of d
's financial crimes enforcement network. under existing law banks and other financial institutions are required to file reports anytime they red flag suspicious activity such as the movement of more than $10,000 in a single transaction, unusual structuring of accounts and so forth. the fbi enjoys full access to these report, but the nation's intelligence agencies must make case-by-case requests for them. this new document proposes the database be linked directly to the nation's intention agencies. for these reports to be of value in detecting money laundering, reuters quotes the treasury document as saying. >> reporter: when the director of national intelligence, general james clapper, testified before congress on tuesday, he said money laundering measures more than a trillion dollars a year, and he lamented deficiencies in our ability to track it all saying inadequate anti-money laundering regulations and lax enforcement of existing ones are challenging international law enforcement efforts. and general clapper, it'ses also worth noting, put financial crimes right alongside cyber warfare as, q
since the assassination. in the aftermath, there was a great imptous to reform the lawes. gallup showed that more than 80% of the country wanted congress to enact the strictest restrictions possible. they believe not able to get anything through congress. bought legally by his asass sin that would not have been legal to buy. that apparently was not enough. it was not until the president's brother was also assassinated and martin luther king jr. was assassinated in 1968 than did got done at the federal level and even then, it was just barely. lbj announced bitterly he did finally get through. >> guns are to be kept out of the the hands of the criminal. and out of the hands of the insane and out of the hands of the irresponsible, then we just must have licensing. if the criminal with a gun is to be tracked down quickly, then we must have registration in this country. the voices that block these safeguards were not the voices of an aroused nation. they were the voices of a powerful lobby, a gun lobby. that has prevailed for the moment. in an election year. we have been through a great deal
exhibits. arguments. administrative law judge will then issue a sdishtion employee bargaining units are happy state agency issued 4 complaints sporingt the firefighters, 2 engineering units and support staff. mayor think the complaints have no merit. >> met and con feared endlessly for months on end so we have done a great deal of negotiations. they will conclude that we met and did that in good faith. >>reporter: the city has seen the pension obligations grow reaching almost 250 million dollars and rising. budget definite sets grew too. cut become and services and staff. union argue they tried to help instead they say san jose residents have paid a price. >> we are suffering longer response time. our citizens are getting less services. crime rates are sky rocketing. homicide rates are rising. >>reporter: process does call for the 2 sides to attempt the settlement. >> labor union in the city remain absolutely available to sit down at any point in time with the city negotiators to meet and confer and bargain over real lawful pension reform. >>reporter: rest logs of this case
, gallego graduated in three years. after law school, he ran for the state house at age 28, more than 20 years after running his first race, gallego decided to run for congress, edging out a former democrat and former five-term democrat in the primary. he went on to beat francisco canseco in a tough general election, focusing on his roots during the campaign. here's a clip. >> as a young latino, he wasn't even allowed to start school until he was 10 years old, but he graduated from college and he won a small business and he pushed his family into the middle class. his sacrifices made sure that my life would be better than his. >> well, joining me now is texas democratic congressman, pete guy y gallego from the only swing district in the state of texas. the only one that is a truly 50/50 district. >> it is the only swing district. >> so coming from a swing district, that means to get 50% plus one, you have to win over more than just democrats. what does that mean on these budget issues? >> as an example, ted cruz carried the $23rd by about six points, i carried it by five. >> there were v
, fighting for tougher gun laws to make our community safe. >> i want these guns off our street. that's why i approve this message. >> the president met with all the house republicans today and actually got a standing ovation. that's next. conservative. very logical thinker. (laughs) i'm telling you right now, the girl back at home would absolutely not have taken a zip line in the jungle. (screams) i'm really glad that girl stayed at home. vo: expedia helps 30 million travelers a month find what they're looking for. one traveler at a time. expedia. find yours. (music throughout) why turbo? trust us. it's just better to be in front. the sonata turbo. from hyundai. >>> you are straining the analogy. >> you know what i mean. >> how did it go? >> it was useful. >> can we ask you how the meeting went? >> he did himself some good. >> president obama continued meeting with all the republicans in the house of representatives in the capital. before the meeting, the president was realistic about the chances of a grand bargain with republicans. >> ultimately, it may be the differences are just too wide.
laws are involved. we'll have to wait to see what the attorney general is looking at. >> thank you, paul. >>> more now on that daring prison escape in canada. police have three people in custody including one of the escapees and reportedly they have the other one cornered. let's bring in paul dagla, live in montreal. what is the latest on the standoff right now? >> as you mentioned, to know, police at this hour telling us that second escapee that from prison has been cornered or they have him surrounded. they are negotiating with him. they have three men, three people in custody, the other escapee and two others who apparently worked with these escapees to get them out. >> how could something like this happen, escaping from a helicopter, inside a prison? >> reporter: it sound like something from a movie really and has many people here in canada, in quebec baffled. what apparently happened one, perhaps two accomplices got a helicopter pilot, somehow forced him to fly over this prison fairly low, apparently. someone was able to drop down a ladder, a rope, and those two inmates were a
. and his new book, "law and disorder." i see what you did there is on shelves now. now that you're retired and unshackled, tell us about some of the more notorious cases that you've worked. >> well, i work cases that receive national publicity and some of the most interesting cases that never received the national publicity. the cases like from david burk wits to the ted bundy, john gacy, to a case in anchorage, alaska, to a plan hunted women down like wild animal. i was over in england on the ripper case. i was in california on the trail side killing case. the unibomber. pretty much a who's who in the types of cases that i work. >> john, i'm kind of curious. not sure exactly how to phrase this. the term would be like a successful serial killer. but somebody who actually gets away with it for a long time. somebody like that have to be of high intelligence to be able to pull it off? >> not really. because sometimes with a high intelligence, they think they're much smarter than law enforcement. i interviewed the btk strangler, bind, torture, kill, a couple years ago. i worked that case back
notion that the bad guys, who ignore the laws, will all the sudden followed new laws. it is not about the bad guys. it is all about the lead. that chunk of metal did the crime. background checks to learn about a person's intentions? the idea should have started with yours. mr. president. [applause] it is great to be back at cpac. it feels like coming home even though it is only my second time here. already i can spot those liberal media folks to write their annual conservative stories. how many of you guys are here? raise your hands. be proud. you are allowed to be loud, we are used to it. we would never dream of making you wait outside. we can come here for an adult conversation about the future of our country and heaven knows we need this. so much of what passes for natural conversation these days is anything but. remember no-drama-obama? now it's all-drama-obama. we do not have leadership coming out of washington, we have reality television. [applause] except it is really bad reality tv and the american people tune out a long time ago. entertainment tv is a good description of what
their dreams. go to legalzoom.com today and make your business dream a reality. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. all the things we love about sunday meals into each of her pot pies. like tender white meat chicken and vegetables in a golden flaky crust that's made from scratch. marie callender's pot pies. it's time to savor. in a golden flaky crust that's made from scratch. do we hano.a mower? a trimmer? no. we got nothing. we just bought our first house, we're on a budget. we're not ready for spring. well let's get you ready. very nice. you see these various colors. we got workshops every saturday. yes, maybe a little bit over here. this spring, take on more lawn for less. not bad for our first spring. more saving. more doing. that's the power of the home depot. get three bags of earthgro mulch, a special buy at just $10. it will if it's new outlast stay fabulous foundation. it's a primer, concealer and foundation in one for all day flawless skin. new outlast stay fabulous from easy, breezy, beautiful covergirl. >>> perhaps you have heard the world has a new pope. until wednesday,
to this has to to meet her father and mother in law. of that moment she would write, had i stepped onto noah's ark, i could not have been more utterly astonished. louisa catherine had a in winning over abigail adams. john adams was easy, he took to her right away. she always felt are a comfortable and well liked by him. abigail is more skeptical. perhaps due to john quincy's teasing. he only gave abigail a little bit of information about louisa catherine. he was not forthright in his intentions. it was a surprise that he married louisa catherine so quickly. abigail did not get a chance to know her. she was quite concerned, although she was an american citizen, she had never been on american soil. this was not what she intended for her son. through time, she learned to grow and love and understand louisa catherine. through the years, they forged a very strong relationship. louisa catherine describing abigail adams as the planet around which all revolved. louisa catherine and john quincy, unlike john adams, if not live at peace field year- round. summerly returned in the to get a relief from t
of it was not just that he was so much bet are than cardinal law who remains over there in the vatican, from boston, involved in all that cover-up. but he is a humble man who doesn't go for the trappings of power. the habit he pears. and he is kind of a franciscan kind of guy. and he is one as well. he didn't go for the big mansion. he got rid of that. and giving way some of the perks of office was a very important statement. humility is important. he is an honor priest and -- i have to say, we are watching something that is a real phenomena. for showbiz, there is nothing like the smoke. none of the pr guys in new york have come up with anything like this. never thought of anything this clever. have smoke come up, white if it is good, black if it's nothing app and at night, it's thrilling. look at faces of these people. they are so excited to be there. i wish i was there. >> let's go back to claudio. talk to chris's point about the feeling in the air. the rain but still the drama as even for the most cynical of people, it is infectious to see the reactions. this woman's face right now smiling with
enforcing prohibition and they had to start enforcing traffic laws, there was resistance from citizens. and to see how, what was once a cooperative relationship between citizens and police really changed once police had to start ticketing people for driving or making arrests for people who were drinking liquor. alcohol was banned in virginia a few years before national legislation was passed. there were people who believed that if they could just go out onto a poet in the potomac and consume liquor, then that was not illegal because they weren't technically in virginia. earlier the alexandria police department didn't need a lot of vehicles. they didn't need a lot of motorcycles. it was a pretty small area they were responsible for patrolling, and so to see the size of alexandria double and then double again in a matter of pretty much 20 years really changed the department, increased staffing, more vehicles and then, ultimately, they had to move to a new police station pause they just couldn't fit in their original station house. one of the stories that i found really interesting is how
2013 unlike the 50s, 60s and 70s and even up to the middle 1980s, they did have the laws but no one to do the clean up. so i'm fully aware that when the at&t park was built and if some folks don't have the history, i will give them the manifest where a lot of contamination was moved and dumped in the bay view. i'm also fully aware commissioners, unbeknownst to you that contamination on pier 30-32 is not being done the right way. what happens when it's not done the right way, people who can remove the hazardous material and take them to a legal site will contact me more to use me so that i can write a blog and that's not my intention. my intention is to send a very clear message to the warriors and the good citizens to do the right thing. i did hear a presentation including 120 buildings going to be plt. build i don't know how it's going to benefit the public trust land. they do the the better interest of filling that campaign. thank you very much. >> or the record dale rye heart. i want to point out a few things. the presentations have been seen in the past. they are old. maybe the
, it was not the observance of the law, but the justification obtained by the faith which abraham, cane from his desend dents the promise of inheriting the world. for that reason, since all depends on faith, all is grace, and so, the promise is assured for all of his descendents. not only for his legal descendents, but also for the descendent that is born from the faith of abraham who is the father of all of us, so says the scripture, i make you the father ofpeeplopl "people"s. that which calls into existence that which does not exist, abraham believed, relying on all hope, that he would become the father of many nations according to what he had said, thus will be your descendents, and for this reason, his justification was valid. >> people will notice that the readings are about fatherhood so nathan and david, the fatherhood of abraham and the gospel about jesus' foster father, joseph. >> and we've had one in english, one in spanish and the gospel will be in greek. >> very beautiful that the gospel is in greek, its original language, of course, but also on to the east in terms of reaching out to the eastern
, the state with the highest rate of oh boast they pass a law that says you cannot do anything. life expectancy in that part of the country is 20 years lower than in our country. >> does the mayor have a point in. >> i am not sure where that stat came from. i cannot debate that. the statistics show we are the most obese state in the nation but the first lady was here celebrating our school initiative that shows that the childhood obesity rate in mississippi has decreased 13 percent. something is being done right without the government. >> some argue also that the government has a right to protect our citizens and if mississippi is the fattest state in the country does the government have a right to the do something? >> i believe there is a place for government to help us, through policy. to go after one industry and the food service industry and say can you not get a bill gulp, i don't think that will make any impact. the flaw in the reasoning is i like to go to instant and only buy a 16-ounce drink but who says i cannot buy two or three the. >> it seems like a hodgepodge and random
police have started prohibition and they started enforcing traffic laws. and to see how, what was once a co-op would've relationship between citizens and police really changed once they had to circuiting people for driving or seeking arrest while drinking liquor. alcohol was banned in virginia two years before national legislation was passed. there were people who believed that they could just go out on the potomac and consume liquor, then that was legal because they were not technically in virginia. earlier the police department needed a lot of vehicles. it was a pretty small area. they were responsible for patrolling and started seeing the size of alexandria double and then double again in a matter of 20 years, really changed the department. the staffing, more vehicles, and ultimately they needed a new police station. one of the stories i find really interesting is how officers began enforcing speed limits. for the like the first 40 years of please departments history you didn't have cars. they were not motorized vehicles. so once cars started coming to alexandria, the question was h
what caused that plane to crash. >>> happening now on this st. patrick's day. law enforcement agencies across the bay area are out in force, trying to keep drunk drivers off the road. in the south bay, the crackdown includes special roving patrols. nbc bay area's monte francis spent part of the evening with the chp on one of the patrols. he is live in san jose with the story. monte? >> reporter: terry, good evening. the reality is for many people today is a day devoted to drinking, and the highway patrol officers we spent some time with tonight say this is an active weekend for dui in the south bay. chp officers brandyn thompson and pierce visare on the look o >> anything out of the order, erratic braking, swerving in a lane, making erratic lane changes. anything that doesn't look normal. >> reporter: an expired registration gives them the chance to check for signs of dui. >> may i have your license, your registration and insurance please? >> yeah. shirks doing about 77. so max speed on this way was 65 miles per hour. >> reporter: a speeding car leads to another stop and another sobrie
this should be handled the law doesn't crack down on people's ability to tap into private exchanges. one thing i think it truly highlights here, if there is a need in social media, even extending into the law breakers, to learn more about what happened, it does, does it not, say something about the energy in this country to produce some truth in this matter? >> yeah. i think there should be more protection for intellectual property on the internet, for people's own communications but i certainly have no faith in the privacy protections now. that is why my e-mails are pretty boring. this is a, dealing with sensitive matters of national security does raise a question, i think, whether classified information may have been compromised and what exactly were the nature of these communications. and, when you consider that other administration officials, former epa administrator, lisa jackson, were using nongovernment chan dmels for their -- channels for their e-mails you have to wonder what is going on inside the administration more broadly. martha: one of the bigger questions that surfaced the last
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